I haven’t hidden my love for the Sydney Markets. One of the reasons why I think they are so great is because I’m always finding weird and wonderful ingredients there. This weekend’s unusual find was breadfruit. I’d never seen it nor heard of it before but after a quick google search I thought ‘what the heck, I’ll give that a go’.

 

 

breadfruit

 

From my googling, I’ve discovered that breadfruit originates from the Pacific and East Indies. When its thick bumpy skin is green it is best to eat as a vegetable but when it ripens further and becomes yellow, it’s best to be eaten as a fruit. As the name suggests, Breadfruit has a starchy, bread-like texture when it is green. It’s been recommended to cook it like a potato – boiled, steamed, baked or fried. I chose to bake it whole then slice the flesh into wedges to pan fry in hot oil

 

breadfruit prepped

 

Prior to baking I removed the stalk and cut a cross in the bottom of the tough skin, this would allow the steam to escape. I wasn't sure if I should wrap the breadfruit in foil or not. i decided to wing it and do without the foil as its skin was like a shell. After 90 minutes I took it out of the oven. It was difficult to tell if the breadfruit was cooked or not. There was steam coming out of the stalk end, I took that as a good sign.

 

breadfruit baked

 

The cooked breadfruit was extremely hot to handle but I managed to slice it in quarters using a sharp knife and tea towel. I was then able to remove the inedible core and prise the white breadfruit away from its armadillo like skin. The breadfruit pieces were sliced into wedges ready for pan frying.

 

breadfruit sliced

 

I pan fried the breadfruit in hot oil and served it in place of potato alongside roast pork and streamed vegetables. After tasting it I could see why it’s used as an alternative to potato. In comparison to potato it had a dryer texture but this may have been my cooking method. The flavour was subtle not unlike mild sweet potato. If I were to cook it again I would use it in a curry or mashed as part of a vegetable patty.

breadfruit served

 

My fried breadfruit looks a bit like golden pineapple sitting alongside the pork on my husband’s dinner plate! Have you ever eaten breadfruit before? How was it served? What did you think of it?

Comments   

#9 Sharon WSFB 2016-04-01 05:56
Quoting Zaahirah:
Wow I would love to find breadfruit in Sydney , it's one of my favourite veggie . The best way to eat is by doing a curry , a sautéed , or liked a fritter coating in a lovely batter .

I sometimes see it at Flemmington markets Zaahirah.
Quote
#8 Zaahirah 2016-03-04 19:30
Wow I would love to find breadfruit in Sydney , it's one of my favourite veggie . The best way to eat is by doing a curry , a sautéed , or liked a fritter coating in a lovely batter .
Quote
#7 sharon TWSFB 2015-03-29 18:33
Quoting Elisa:
Hi Sharon, wow i never knew you can find that at Sydney Markets. This is one of Samoa's favourite dish which is a substitute for rice in some households in the Islands. You can find other ways to cook Ulu (breadfruit) in Samoa on youtube :-)

Elisa I stumbled across it near or a the fresh coconut cream stand. I love finding new ingredients to try.
Quote
#6 Elisa 2015-03-25 08:41
Hi Sharon, wow i never knew you can find that at Sydney Markets. This is one of Samoa's favourite dish which is a substitute for rice in some households in the Islands. You can find other ways to cook Ulu (breadfruit) in Samoa on youtube :-)
Quote
#5 Jon 2014-10-24 12:16
Pan-fried breadfruit is the wrong way to cook it in my opinion, it's dry and sometimes chewy and the flavour is less pronounced.

I've had it several times in restaurants overseas. I think they boil it because each time I tried it, it was like a potato with a moist, slightly sticky outer layer which had a slightly sweet buttery taste. Delicious. WAY better than potato.

The Kanak people of New Caledonia have a dish called Bougna which is basically a mix of breadfruit, pumpkin, other vegetables, chicken and some local spices wrapped in banana leaves and tossed directly on hot coal. It's really really good.
Quote
#4 Sharon TWSFB 2014-05-07 18:27
@augustina I was surprised at how easy it was. I think the hardest part was slicing the hot shell as I was too impatient to wait for it to cool.
Quote
#3 Augustina 2014-05-02 10:27
You really make it seem really easy together with your presentation
however I find this matter to be actually something which I feel I would never understand.
It kind of feels too complex and extremely extensive for me.
I'm having a look ahead to your subsequent post, I will attempt to get the hold of it!


Here is my web blog; work From home mom: http://www.binaryoptionssite.com/profile.php?u=LoFoerster
Quote
#2 Sharon TWSFBlog 2014-04-22 12:07
That sounds delicious! I love Sri Lankan food.
Quote
#1 @Sugarintheplum 2014-04-20 19:40
Much better this way, though it requires a bit more prep work. But it's so tasty that it's all I want to eat when I return to Sri Lanka. Serve with rice and thinly sliced cucumber salad in lime and salt. You really don't need anything else:
http://www.infolanka.com/recipes/mess3/148.html
Quote

Add comment

Security code
Refresh